Vittorio Innocenti Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2013

2013
Sangiovese Blend
Vittorio Innocenti

More Wines from Vittorio Innocenti

$30.00

Mix and match with other Direct wines from this producer for minimum purchase of 6 bottles (or equivalent of 4500mL) per producer. Purchases must be in multiples of 6. Ships directly from winery to you in a few weeks - $4/bottle for 12 (+$2 if order less than $400) or more & $6/bottle for 6 (+$2 if order less than $200)per producer.

Our tasting impressions

When tasting this alongside the 2014, it is apparent which is from the stronger vintage. This 2013 has deeper and richer aromatics. There is sweet, herb-inflected - very pure fruit. A terrific Sangiovese now that will continue to develop and improve.

 

About this wine

Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG is, along with Brunello and Chianti Classico, the epitome of Sangiovese-based wines in Tuscany. At their best, Vino Nobile combine the power of Brunello with the finesse of Chianti.

 

Innocenti’s Vino Nobile is a very traditional blend of predominantly Sangiovese (technically Prugnolo Gentile, the name for its local sub-variety) with some Cannaiolo and Colorino. Fermentation and maceration, with the skins, lasts 15-20 days. It ages 30 months in oak barrels (only 24 is required) then passes through a wide-grain filter for bottling. Bottle aging is at least 2 months prior to release but usually much longer as Innocenti is always at least a couple of vintages behind most other producers.

 

About the grape blend

Sangiovese is the most planted grape in Italy and is the dominant grape throughout the central part of the country. There are many variants and even different names like Prugnolo Gentile, Brunello, Sangioveto and Morellino.

 

The grapes are dark and thick skinned, slow-ripening, acidic and tannic. Like Pinot Noir, Sangiovese is heavily influenced by its terroir and similarly can be quite transparent in its differences from place to place.

 

Cannaiolo and Colorino are traditional blending grapes for Tuscan Sangiovese. Colorino is sparsely used today. Apropos of the name, its deep pigmentation mostly adds color to the blend but also tannins. Cannaiolo balances the other two with softness and imparts graceful herbal flavors.

 

About the vintage 

Spring of 2013 was generally cold and wet but ideal conditions reigned in the summer. The result was a classic Tuscan vintage. The wines tend to be bright, fresh, classy and refined. 


Suggested Glassware: Grassl Liberté

Vittorio Innocenti

Vittorio Innocenti, a former philosophy teacher and his son Tommaso run this estate from a 13th century cellar in Montefollonico. They own 32 hectares in and around Montepulciano but only 12 are planted with vineyards of up to 50 years old. The vista views from the back patio are incredible.

 

They produce seven wines, but the cellars (in multiple locations) are dominated by the small barrels containing Vin Santo - a traditional Tuscan dessert wine. Vittorio says he has enough crops to produce more wine but he can’t because there is no room to store it.

 

Vittorio speaks no English and I no Italian. So we struggle to communicate in French unless, as usually is the case, his close friend Laura is on hand to translate. Despite the language gap, I like and have a deep respect for Vittorio. He is intensely committed to producing the highest quality wines and takes as much pride in his most modest offering as he does his top bottling.

 

VDLT is the only North American source for these extraordinary wines.